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BioClinica Inks eClinical Contracts

By Kristin Brooks | March 26, 2014

To provide enterprise-wide technology and support services

BioClinica, Inc. has recently signed multi-year contract renewals valued at $30 million with two major pharmaceutical companies for its cloud-based technologies and services across its eClinical products.  
 
Under the first contract, BioClinica will provide resources and subject matter services in clinical supply chain distribution systems and processes that extend to several thousand investigators using Interactive Response Technology (IRT) worldwide.
 
In the second agreement, BioClinica’s OnPoint CTMS and Express EDC technologies will be deployed for clinical operations including data management, study design, and related professional services that support global clinical studies. Enterprise-wide implementation of cloud-based technologies is also currently underway for each organization.
 
“Large back-to-back awards like this demonstrate that BioClinica lives up to the high expectations of top tier pharma,” said BioClinica’s president of eClinical Solutions Peter Benton. “BioClinica technologies accommodate the high volume of studies conducted by large life science companies and enable sponsors to drive their research forward.”

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