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Quintiles, OmniComm Ink TrialOne Agreement

April 16, 2014

To standardize global Phase I clinics on TrialOne technology

Quintiles Transnational has signed a five-year agreement with OmniComm Systems for its TrialOne technology for Phase I clinic automation. The TrialOne software replaces Quintiles legacy Phase I Clinical Trial Development System (PICTS), and is part of a company-wide initiative to standardize global Phase I clinics on a single technology aimed at increasing performance, functionality and better decision-making tools.
 
TrialOne will be deployed at ECD clinics in the U.S. and UK, and will be integrated with Quintiles’ analytics platform, Infosario, providing access to client-specific data libraries that can be developed and segregated for study start-up to clients' data specifications. Also, a GMP compliant pharmacy labeling package will allow Quintiles clinics to produce investigational product labels in one system.
 
"OmniComm is delighted to add Quintiles to our growing list of TrialOne clients," said Randy Smith, OmniComm's chief technology officer and TrialOne Group Executive Sponsor. "TrialOne's comprehensive functionality and global deployment will allow Quintiles to realize operational efficiencies which will translate into superior service and faster, industry data for Quintiles and their clients."

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