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Sharp Packaging Solutions Adds KL1 Tablet Counters

June 13, 2014

Validation study shows 50% reduction in QC time

Sharp Packaging Solutions has added Kirby Lester’s KL1 tablet counters following completion of a validation study showing a reduction in quality control (QC) time of 50% and increased counting accuracy. Sharp now uses KL1 tablet counters for hourly QC checks on all bottling lines and for small quantity bottle filling.
 
Sharp completes more than 100 pharmaceutical bottling projects per month on fully automated bottling lines, and a major compliance requirement for a bottling line is to assure accurate product counts. Manual counting and QC methods are commonly used in the packaging processes but can negatively affect accuracy and GMP compliance. The KL1 was designed to decrease QA inspection time during commercial bottling and increase filling accuracy.
 
“After we completed validation testing, we found the KL1 met every expectation,” said Ron Bates, Sharp’s senior project engineer for new business development. “The KL1 devices decrease counting time and improve accuracy. If you are in the business of verifying in-process counts of bottles, the KL1 should get a serious examination.”

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