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Harlan CRS, Fluofarma Enter Strategic Discovery Pact

July 15, 2014

To employ Fluofarma discovery and translational services

Harlan Laboratories, Ltd., through its Contract Research Services (CRS) business, has entered a strategic partnership with Fluofarma, a CRO specializing in high content analysis, for drug discovery and translational medicine services. Harlan CRS will use Fluofarma’s expertise in high content analysis, biomarkers quantification and high content histology, including applications to mechanistic toxicology and prediction of toxicity.
 
“One of our goals is to help our customers reduce the risk of drug attrition during the development process,” said Ciriaco Maraschiello, director of strategic initiatives and director of drug discovery and translational medicine at Harlan CRS. “This alliance with Fluofarma enables us to strengthen our services during the early stages of development so that we can be a key partner for our customers.”
 
“We’re very proud of this agreement with Harlan CRS,” added Jean-Baptiste Pin, chief executive officer of Fluofarma. “It will be a tremendous growth accelerator for Fluofarma by improving our international visibility. For us, it’s the confirmation that our high content analysis technologies and translational research skills can add value to the global drug development process.”
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