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Almac Expands UK Commercial Capacity

October 3, 2012

Acquires new blistering technology

Almac has expanded its MHRA/FDA-approved UK commercial packaging facility with the acquisition of a Noack N 623 blister packaging line from Romaco. The line accommodates enhanced flexibility for larger blister sizes and multi unit blister formats, coupled with a requirement for non-permeability and enhanced environmental protection.
 
This cGMP-compliant technology can be configured to process both thermoform and coldform materials, with maximum blister sizes of 220mm x 155mm. The Noack N 623 has an automatic feeding system, filling inspection and ejection station and shorter set-up times. It can process more than 25,000 blisters per hour, including multi-product blisters.
 
“Blister size and dosage formats are becoming increasingly more complex. Additionally, product handling for innovative new molecules often requires enhanced environmental controls. This investment allows Almac, through its Pharma Services business unit, to offer this additional flexibility,” said Geoff Sloan vice president of manufacturing operations. “Through this acquisition, coupled with our immanent entry into the U.S. commercial packaging market, we continue to expand our capabilities and flexibility to meet our client’s needs.”

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