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Catalent, Umn Pharma in Biosimilar Pact

December 13, 2012

Will use GPEx technology to produce cell lines

Catalent Pharma Solutions has signed an agreement with UMN Pharma, Inc. to provide a broad range of biosimilar cell lines using its GPEx technology. UMN and its subsidiary Unigen, will produce a number of biosimilars using Catalent’s GPEx cell lines. UMN will build an alliance of pharmaceutical companies for product development including clinical trials, marketing and sales. UMN plans to begin multiple biosimilar projects through alliances for the Asian market.
 
“There are great synergies between UMN Pharma and Catalent in terms of technologies, business structure, speed and culture,” said Masahiro Michishita, executive chairman of UMN Pharma. “Harnessing Catalent’s broad biologics development and cell construction expertise gives UMN Pharma a unique platform to grow our biosimilars business globally.”
 
Barry Littlejohns, Catalent’s business unit president, said, “This agreement will allow Catalent to continue to grow its biologics development and manufacturing interests of multiple biosimilars and NBEs, particularly in the Asian market. UMN Pharma’s ambitious expansion plans reflect Catalent’s strategy for growth in what we consider to be a key market.”

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