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SAFC Expands Irvine Facility

March 5, 2013

Adds Dry Powder Manufacturing Capabilities

Sigma-Aldrich Corp.’s custom manufacturing and services business unit, SAFC, will expand its manufacturing plant in Irvine, Scotland to include large-scale production of bulk dry power media and reagents to support the European and Asia Pacific market. The expansion adds to SAFC's manufacturing capabilities at it existing dry powder media facility in Lenexa, KS.
 
SAFC will construct a purpose-built Animal Component Free (ACF) dry powder media manufacturing facility to complement the existing liquid cell culture media, buffers, and reagents capabilities in Irvine. The facility expansion will also include additional raw material and finished goods warehousing, and is expected be ready in 1Q14.
 
"We remain committed to investing in areas where we can deliver tangible value for our global customer base," said Gilles Cottier, president of SAFC. "These investments and subsequent customer benefits continue to set SAFC apart as a supplier of choice in the industry. We are grateful to Scotland's First Minister, Alex Salmond, and Scottish Enterprise for their support with this expansion in Scotland."

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