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Evotec, Harvard in Antibacterials Alliance

May 17, 2013

Will leverage chemical and biological expertise

Evotec AG has entered a research collaboration with Harvard University to discover and develop novel anti-bacterial agents based on a validated target family in bacterial cell wall biosynthesis.
 
Harvard and Evotec will identify and optimize small molecule inhibitors of bacterial cell wall synthesis, based on enabling technologies and chemical starting points licensed from Harvard. Evotec will use its drug discovery infrastructure to address anti-bacterial targets, specifically peptidoglycan biosynthesis (PGB). Evotec will commercialize any resulting assets.
 
"We are pleased to have entered into this collaboration with Harvard in the antibacterial space," said Dr. Werner Lanthaler, chief executive officer of Evotec. "The lack of new antibacterials has been broadly recognized as a major unmet medical need as antibiotics pipelines are drying up while resistance against existing drugs is on the rise. We are excited to team up with our colleagues at Harvard to systematically target a highly validated but under-exploited anti-bacterial target family."

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